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Social Media Best Practices

Posts Tagged ‘productivity

Offline Meets Online, How to Use Your Social Networking Skills in Real Life Situations

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As much as business connections have moved online with the advent of LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook, “Face to Face” is still King when making new connections. But how do you leverage both in this Web 2.0 world? In this post I will examine best practices.

Recently over drinks I was chatting with a seasoned salesperson who eloquently informed me that “It’s never been so easy, yet so hard to do business”. The environment we’re in has created a double-edged sword. Through digital technology (blogs, social networks and websites) it’s never been easier to understand who our customers are and what they need. However, this has resulted in the bar being raised with customers who are more demanding, impolite and curt than ever before.

But as much as things are changing at a rapid pace, networking events are still very relevant. They may have evolved, but have not completely changed in that they continue to be noisy, crowded and full of libations.  So how do you make the most of them?

1-    Before the event

With many events powered by MeetUp, Eventbrite and Facebook it has become easier to see who will be attending. Not only does this give you validation as to whether it’s worthwhile, but also provides you with great insights as to whom you need to be in contact with. Use social networks to secure information on who they are.

 

2-    During the event

For most, meeting new people is one of life’s daunting challenges. If there’s someone who I find important that I might not know, I like to use my smartphone apps to locate their LinkedIn Profile. To dive deeper as to what they’re thinking I use Google Search to discover what they’re saying on Twitter (Google provides better results on finding the person than Twitter itself). Think this is intrusive? Within a few years facial recognition technology will allow you take a picture of a person and bring up their entire social graph.

The good news is that age-old rules still apply when making a new acquaintance.  A couple of points I find that work for me are:

A-    When the moment presents itself (do not interrupt an ongoing conversation), introduce yourself with what’s known as an  “Open Face”. This can be described as the warm feeling you get when you see a baby or puppy for the 1st time; pass that happiness on to the other person.  Smile, but be natural.

B-    If possible, shake that person’s hand and introduce yourself. Say something nice about them or their company, but be genuine.

C-    Be generally interested in what that person has to say and add value.

D-   When speaking about your own business, convey a one or two sentence value proposition that will instantly make that person understand what you do.

E-    Don’t talk at length about your business. Talk about their business or topic of importance to them.  Remember, that everyone wants to feel important and special.

F-    Don’t overstay your welcome. If that prospect is the decision maker, ask for a business card and leave with value; offer to do something for that person (send a case study or client example)

 

3-    After the event

For prospects you find want to build a business relationship with, your follow-up is key.  If you want to really stand out, a personal handwritten note will wow any executive, but a brief e-mail that is followed by a LinkedIn invite or Twitter follow is customary these days. Think of the e-mail like an actual handwritten note; but keep it short, sweet and to the point. Mention how you met, what you discussed, attach follow-up items (articles or case studies) and outline next steps. If you feel your impression was strong enough, by all means and ask for a follow-up meeting.  These executives are inundated with e-mails all day long, so make sure you have a strong subject line. I like to cite my own name as well as the value I’m offering in the e-mail “Derek Reese from XYZ, Case Study on Small Business”. Avoid terms like “Hi, Opportunity and Savings” because these are triggers for your e-mail to wind up in their spam folder.

If you think this company is a strong target, you might want to set up an RSS feed from their news page or Google alert, these will give you key insights into changes in the company.

Most importantly! Add value when you communicate in the future.

If you have any direct questions, please feel free to contact me on LinkedIn or follow me on Twitter.

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Written by Derek Reese

July 28, 2011 at 1:22 pm

6 Apps That Will Improve Productivity

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According to Apple, there are 350K iPhone Applications, with Android catching up fast at over 100K. With such an array of options, what are the BEST to make you more productive? In this post I will examine six I use on a daily basis.

So what makes a good application? I find it bridges mobile with notebook/desktop/cloud/offline, providing a seamless experience that allows you to easily find the information you’re looking for and/or store it for later use. Of course, it’s something used on regular basis and probably will be missed if removed.

 

1-    Instapaper: $4.99 (iPhone/Android)

One of the biggest challenges I face in my day-to-day routine is time management. There’s so much information coming at you, especially when it comes to news/information related to your industry. You don’t want to miss these messages, but it also can be difficult to read these right away. I find Instapaper to be an amazing solution because I can quickly bookmark articles/webpages and convert them to “text” format so I can read them later. While traveling or commuting, I can easily pull these articles at my convenience, instead of having 20 browsers open at the end of the day.

 

2-    Evernote: FREE  (iPhone, Android/Blackberry)

I often come up with my best ideas on the go. Before Evernote, I used to scribble down these ideas on a napkin, credit card receipt or in a notebook, or other places where they are easily lost. Evernote allows me to keep those ideas organized in a central location that I can access at a later time. What I like about this application is that I can take an idea I’ve started on my smartphone and continue working with it on my computer because they’re synched together.

3-    Dropbox: FREE (iPhone and Android)

Dropbox provides a central storage point and nice back-up system for files you’re working on. Plus it works well with large files. For example, your team might be working collaboratively on a project. Rather than wasting time and requesting the latest version (and waiting for that version), you can speed up the process by going directly into the file. Also, if your smartphone has limited memory or needs back up, you can easily move/copy files to Dropbox.

4-    Weekly Cal:  $1.99 (iPhone Only)

Your calendar is your lifeline and the good folks at Utilitap have improved the iPhone calendar by offering you a weekly view, as well as full calendar support (Google/Outlook). Most importantly, I find the drag and drop functionality to be useful for someone on the go. Let’s say that your client suddenly wants to change tomorrow’s meeting to the following day. Instead of opening the event and manually changing the time, you can now “drag and drop” to the new time.

5-    Tripit: FREE (iPhone /Android/Blackberry)

Trip-It is terrific because you can build itineraries without having to input information- it does the work for you. For example, let’s say you have a trip to Atlanta on Tuesday. You booked your flight/hotel/car rental on different days via different e-mail addresses. What’s amazing is you can e-mail each one of these to Trip-It and they will create a profile for the trip. So when you get to the airport, you know what flight to take, find your car rental when you land and drive to the right hotel, all without wasting time trying to find various e-mail confirmation numbers.

6-    Yelp: FREE (iPhone and Android)

While Google maps are great for finding a client’s office; if you’re on the go and need to find a coffee shop, restaurant or dry cleaners now and not familiar with the area, Yelp is a great resource. The service enhances Google Maps by pairing product reviews with location-based search. So not only can one find what restaurants are good nearby, you can filter by price, cuisine, or distance. Once a suitable venue is located, Yelp uses Google Maps to produce directions.

With new applications are being developed everyday, I’m sure this list will change quickly. What ones are helping your productivity?